Cicero, Rhetoric, and Empire by C. E. W. Steel

By C. E. W. Steel

This research of Cicero's political oratory and Roman imperialism within the overdue Republic bargains new readings of ignored speeches. C.E.W. metal examines the function and capacities of political oratory and places Cicero's angle to empire, with its boundaries and weaknesses, within the context of wider debates between his contemporaries at the difficulties of empire.

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W. ’, in J. G. F. Powell and J. J. ), Cicero the Advocate (Oxford: Oxford Univ. Press, forthcoming), on Verrines 2. 1. 63–85. A. Haury, L’Ironie et l’humour chez Cicéron (Leiden: E. J. Brill, 1955), 117–22, summarizes Cicero’s use of humour and irony in the speeches. 6 For a summary of the historical background, see R. Seager, ‘The Rise of Pompey’, CAH 9, 2nd edn. (1994), 208–28, 221–3. 7 quid agam, iudices? quo accusationis meae rationem conferam? 10 He begins by explaining, and dismissing, what Verres is said to have done to deal with the danger of a slave revolt, and then turns to a more general description of Verres as a military commander (2.

Press, 1992), 1–17, repr. in his Collected Papers on Latin Literature, ed. S. J. Harrison (Oxford: Oxford Univ. Press, 1995), 362–80, on Verrines 2. 5. 92–5, and by C. E. W. ’, in J. G. F. Powell and J. J. ), Cicero the Advocate (Oxford: Oxford Univ. Press, forthcoming), on Verrines 2. 1. 63–85. A. Haury, L’Ironie et l’humour chez Cicéron (Leiden: E. J. Brill, 1955), 117–22, summarizes Cicero’s use of humour and irony in the speeches. 6 For a summary of the historical background, see R. Seager, ‘The Rise of Pompey’, CAH 9, 2nd edn.

Verres’ moral weakness is epitomized by his costume: in place of the toga he should be wearing in his civilian capacity, or military garb on campaign, he is wearing a Greek cloak and a long tunic. The implications of this are twofold. On the one hand, Verres is behaving as a Greek (a picture compounded by the presence on the beach of a Rhodian flute-player); in response to the Hellenized environment of Sicily, he is showing signs of going native and as a result is not behaving as a Roman should.

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